Battarrea stevenii – Tall Stiltball

In dry, sandy soil in native vegetation. The woody stem of this puffball is very tall, light brown and scaly. Fruit-bodies emerge from a sand-coloured ‘egg’. This splits to form a cup (volva) at the stem base and, at the top, a cushion-shaped &#821...

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Dictyopanus pusillus – Little Ping-pong Bat

On living and dead eucalyptus tree-trunks in forests. This very tiny, cream to white fungus grows in massed tiers on the substrate. Cream pores appear large for the size of the fruit-body. A small disc attaches the stem to the substrate. Generously sponsored b...

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Neolentiporus maculatissimus – Austral Dryad’s Saddle

On dead eucalypt trunks and logs in high-altitude forests. This kidney-shaped bracket grows in overlapping tiers. Brown scales are arranged concentrically on a pale brown cap. The cream pores dry brown. The stem, if present is black and off-centre or lateral, ...

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Microporous xanthopus – Yellow-footed Tinypore

On fallen twigs, branches and logs in near coastal northern rainforests. This paper-thin polypore is easily recognised by its funnel shape and yellow ‘foot’ (basal disc) attaching the central yellow stem to the substrate. The smooth shiny cap patte...

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Microporous affinis – Dark-footed Tinypore

On fallen branches in rainforests. This fan-shaped bracket has a velvety, ridged cap with concentric zones of brown, red, yellow and black. On the underside of the cap are minute white pores. Distinctive characteristics for this species are the saucer-shaped d...

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